Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Noncalcified Coronary Plaque Volumes in Healthy People with a Family History of Early-Onset Coronary Artery Disease.


Noncalcified Coronary Plaque Volumes in Healthy People with a Family History of Early-Onset Coronary Artery Disease.
Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Feb 27;
Authors: Kral BG, Becker LC, Vaidya D, Yanek LR, Qayyum R, Zimmerman SL, Dey D, Berman DS, Moy TF, Fishman EK, Becker DM

BACKGROUND: -Although age and sex distributions of calcified plaque (CCP) have been well described in the general population, noncalcified plaque (NCP) distributions remain unknown. This is important because NCP is a putative precursor for clinical CAD and could serve as a sentinel for aggressive primary prevention, especially in higher risk populations. We examined the distributions of NCP and CCP in healthy 30-74 year old individuals from families with early-onset coronary artery disease (CAD).
METHODS AND RESULTS: -Participants in the GeneSTAR family study (N=805), mean age 51.1 ± 10.8 years, 56% female, were screened for CAD risk factors and for coronary plaque using dual-source CT angiography. Plaque volumes (mm(3)) were quantified using a validated automated method. The prevalence of coronary plaque was 57.8% in males and 35.8% in females (p<0.0001). NCP volume increased with age (p<0.001) and was higher in males than females (p<0.001). Although NCP, as a percent of total plaque, was inversely related to age (p<0.01), NCP accounted for most of the total plaque volume at all ages, especially in males and females <55 years (>70% and >80%, respectively). Higher Framingham risk was associated with the number of affected vessels (p<0.01) but 44% of males and 20.8% of females considered intermediate risk had left main and/or 3-vessel disease involvement.
CONCLUSIONS: -The majority of coronary plaque was noncalcified, particularly in younger individuals. These findings support the importance of assessing family history and suggest that early primary prevention interventions may be warranted at younger ages in families with early onset CAD.

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